donderdag 19 februari 2015

A proper story



Several years ago, a naïve art history student sat in a lecture dozing off after hours of study, when the teacher told of an excavation in northern Israel, where the remains indicated the presence of a synagogue. This would be an interesting opportunity, as there was the possible chance of finding a mosaic floor (she apparently mixed up this excavation with the one at Huqoq, but hindsight is always 20-20). So the naïve art history student, whose knowledge of archaeology was limited to “wear a hat and be awesome”,  signed on with delusions of an exciting far off holiday for people whose cultural understanding went further than questioning the sanity of the Romans for building the Colosseum.  In 2012, this by then considerably less airheaded art history student began writing a blog to share the masochistic pleasures of participating in an archaeological excavation with the good folks at home, and to highlight some of the more eccentric phenomena

 
Our desires are...unconventional



It is now 2015 and, as some may have noticed, the blog has been clinically dead for a while. The past few years have been a bit busier and seen my summers at Horvat Kur become more involved, leaving less time for the writing of the blog. This year, I hope to change that and once again bring you, dear reader, many stories to satisfy your desires for information and Schadenfreude. In 2014 we documented and reviewed many of our finds years of field work during a dedicated study season. Items from the excavation at Tel Kinrot were restored, reorganised and carefully packaged for storage, so that they can be found again with ease the net time they are required. For Horvat Kur, the stratigraphy and architectural features were discussed and analysed, pottery was researched and metal objects that came back from cleaning were photographed.


also guitar music, lots of guitar music

Since the study season was so fruitful, we are once again able to excavate for a bit, so 2015 will see us go out into the field. It will be exciting to once again be taking most of my pictures during ‘magic hour’ (the hours just after sunrise and just before sunset), to have to dodge randomly thrown scorpions, to feel the warm dust be kicked up, to curse and whine about the six varieties of chicken, to sit at the Sea of Galilee and watch the herons streak low over the water and to be involved with the buzz at the field lab. But most of all it will be good to see the dear people of Horvat Kur again. In the meantime, look forward to some archaeological topics, both serious and nonsensical.

Signing off for now

Geen opmerkingen:

Een reactie plaatsen